Switzerland Holidays

Switzerland

Switzerland is a mountainous Central European country, home to numerous lakes, villages and the high peaks of the Alps. Old Towns within its cities contain medieval landmarks like capital Bern’s Zytglogge clock tower and Cathedral of Bern. The country is also a destination for its ski resorts and hiking trails. Banking and finance are key industries, and Swiss watches and chocolate are renowned. The Swiss climate is generally temperate, but can vary greatly between the localities,[46] from glacial conditions on the mountaintops to the often pleasant near Mediterranean climate at Switzerland's southern tip. Switzerland ranks top or close to the top in several metrics of national performance, including government transparency, civil liberties, quality of life, economic competitiveness, and human development. It has the highest nominal wealth. , the Swiss population of approximately 8 million people is concentrated mostly on the Plateau, where the largest cities are to be found: among them are the two global and economic centres, Zürichand Geneva.

The Jungfrau Region

The Jungfrau Region offers spectacular scenery to bewitch the eye. The white peaks of three towering mountains – the Jungfrau, Monch, and Eiger – contrast with the green valleys and meadows in this Alpine wonderland. Enjoy the fresh mountain air while visiting this place. Imposing mountains, a plethora of leisure activities and a wide range of hotel offerings make the Jungfrau Region (including the resort towns Wengen, Mürren und Lauterbrunnen) a highly desirable vacation destination.

Chateau de Chillon,Montreux

The town of Montreux is located in the heart of the Swiss Riviera on the shores of Lake Geneva. Walk by the lakeside and explore the Chillon Castle, or take a tour of the tower, courtyards, dungeons, and rooms of this 11th-century castle. It's the most frequently visited historical building in Switzerland, where its numerous rooms house weaponry, frescoes, and furniture. The castle can be reached by walking along the lakefront or taking the train or trolley bus.

St.Moritz

A famous playground of the wealthy, St. Moritz is a winter resort which offers skiing and a variety of summer and winter sports, as well as mud and mineral baths and mud therapies. Savour caviar and truffles in some of the resorts' fine restaurants, or take a spa treatment at the Health Spa Centre. This town is also known for its active and expensive nightlife.

The Rhine Falls

Situated near the town of Schaffhausen, Europe's largest waterfall is a magnificent natural wonder. Near the falls is the medieval castle, Schoss Laufen, which houses a restaurant, a youth hostel, and shops. On Swiss National Day, 1 August, the Rhine Falls is host to fantastic display of fireworks which attracts thousands of tourists.

Zermatt

When most people think of Zermatt, they think of one thing: The Matterhorn. This ultimate Swiss icon looms over Zermatt, first drawing visitors here in the 1860s. The village of Zermatt itself is lovely and car-free, with old-fashioned brown chalets and winding alleys. (Don’t worry, you don’t have to walk everywhere—there are electric vehicles and horse-drawn cabs.) Skiing in the region often lasts through early summer, but when the weather’s warmer, it’s a great time to hike.

Zurich

The shores of Lake Geneva have attracted visitors and invaders for millennia. The cheerful city of Geneva sits on the lake's western shore, lofty snowcapped peaks creating a gorgeous backdrop on all sides. The city is perfect for exploring on foot; hire a bike to venture further. At the top of any itinerary should be visits to Geneva's lakefront and its famous fountain, the Flower Clock in the English Garden, St Peter's Cathedral, Reformation Wall, Place Neuve and the birthplace of UN.

Geneva

When most people think of Zermatt, they think of one thing: The Matterhorn. This ultimate Swiss icon looms over Zermatt, first drawing visitors here in the 1860s. The village of Zermatt itself is lovely and car-free, with old-fashioned brown chalets and winding alleys. (Don’t worry, you don’t have to walk everywhere—there are electric vehicles and horse-drawn cabs.) Skiing in the region often lasts through early summer, but when the weather’s warmer, it’s a great time to hike.

Lake Geneva

Lake Geneva (Lac Léman in French) is a crescent-shaped lake and holiday destination between eastern France and western Switzerland. Geneva, the Swiss city at its southern tip, is a diplomatic hub with luxury shopping and a cobbled old town. The chic Swiss Riviera stretches along the north shore past Lausanne, a medieval-era port with an Olympics museum and Gothic cathedral. The first recorded name of the lake is Lacus Lemannus, dated from Roman times; Lemannus comes from Ancient greek Limanos, Limènos Limne Λιμένος Λίμνη meaning port's lake; it became Lacus Lausonius, although this name was also used for a town or district on the lake, Lacus Losanetes and then the Lac de Lausanne in the Middle Ages. Lake Geneva is the largest body of water in Switzerland, and greatly exceeds in size all others that are connected with the main valleys of the Alps. It is in the shape of a crescent, with the horns pointing south, the northern shore being 95 km (59 mi), the southern shore 72 km (45 mi) in length. The crescent form was more regular in a recent geological period, when the lake extended to Bex, about 18 km (11 mi) south of Villeneuve.

Jet d'Eau

The Jet d'Eau is a large fountain in Geneva, Switzerland, and is one of the city's most famous landmarks, being featured on the city's official tourism web site and on the official logo for Geneva's hosting of the 2008 UEFA Championships. The Jet d'Eau (French pronunciation: [ʒɛ do], Water-Jet) is a large fountain in Geneva, Switzerland, and is one of the city's most famous landmarks, being featured on the city's official tourism web site and on the official logo for Geneva's hosting of the 2008 UEFA Championships. Situated at the point where Lake Geneva empties into the Rhône, it is visible throughout the city and from the air, even when flying over Geneva at an altitude of 10 km (33,000 ft). Five hundred litres (110 gallons/132 gallons US) of water per second are jetted to an altitude of 140 metres (459 feet) by two 500 kW pumps, operating at 2,400 V, consuming one megawatt of electricity. The water leaves the nozzle at a speed of 200 km/h (124 mph). Diameter of the nozzle is exactly 4 inches (d=10,16cm). Maximum height of water jet is about 140 meters above water level. When it is in operation, at any given moment there are about 7,000 litres (1,542 gallons/1,849 gallons US) of water in the air. Unsuspecting visitors to the fountain—which can be reached via a stone jetty from the left bank of the lake—may be surprised to find themselves drenched after a slight change in wind direction.

Palace of Nations

The Palace of Nations (French: Palais des Nations, pronounced: [palɛ de nɑsjɔ̃]) in Geneva, Switzerland, was built between 1929 and 1936 to serve as the headquarters of the League of Nations. It has served as the home of the United Nations Office at Geneva since 1946 when theSecretary-General of the United Nations signed a Headquarters Agreement with the Swiss authorities, although Switzerland did not become a member of the UN until 2002. In 2012 alone, the Palace of Nations hosted more than 10,000 intergovernmental meetings. A jury of architects was selected to choose a final design from among three-hundred and thirty-seven entries but was unable to decide on a winner. Ultimately, the five architects behind the leading entries were chosen to collaborate on a final design: Julien Flegenheimer ofSwitzerland, Camille Lefèvre and Henri-Paul Nénot of France, Carlo Broggi of Italy and József Vágó of Hungary. Donations from League members were used in the interior. The Palace is located in Ariana Park, which was bequeathed to the City of Geneva in 1890 by Gustave de Revilliod de la Rive, on three conditions: that the park always remain accessible to the public, that he be buried in the park, and that peacocks roam freely on its grounds, which they do to this day. The park also contains a 1668 chalet.